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Vermont Gold Prospecting

Posted by Sea Hunter 
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Lifetime Member
Vermont Gold Prospecting
February 12, 2011 12:19PM
Information provided by a freind.

Vermont Gold Prospecting
Reports of gold being found in Vermont are on record from as early as 1845, when State Geologist C.B. Adams, in the “First Annual Report on the Geology of Vermont,” reported a find in Somerset, Vermont.
The California gold rush, which began four years later, enticed many Vermonters to search for gold outside their home state. During the mid-1850s, most of these gold hunters returned home. In 1849, Captain Abial Slayton, a Vermonter, struck it rich at a California gold claim. Upon his return to Vermont in 1855, Slayton found gold in what was then Hull’s Brook, now Gold Brook, in Stowe. Although he set up a sluicing operation employing several people, it never compared to the financial gain realized from the California claim. A tribute to Captain Slayton’s efforts was made in 1887 at the Mount Mansfield Electric Railroad, when the last spike to be driven was coated with Slayton’s gold.
In 1854, a mine of “gold, silver, lead and copper” was opened at Bridgewater, Vermont (Jackson, 1854). Gold was said to have been found there as small, irregular grains in quartz. Dr. C.T. Jackson noted in 1867 that the great Appalachian gold belt passed through Plymouth and Bridgewater.
By the 1900s, however, it was determined that while gold was present in the state, it did not occur in paying quantities. Gold-bearing rocks in Plymouth and Bridgewater were mined, but the cost of getting the metal was far greater than the metal was worth. Dr. G.H. Perkins, Vermont State Geologist in 1900, stated “. . . it is therefore useless to spend time and money in trying to find a fortune in gold mining in Vermont. Considerable money has been lost because it was invested in such mining, but I have yet to hear of much that was made in this way in this state. Occasionally a little ‘pay dirt’ has been found, but in a short time the promising mine has been left un-worked.” The mine shafts from these mining efforts can still be observed in Bridgewater and Plymouth.
Placer deposits were identified in the Plymouth area about 1855. Gold in the stream beds and the hillside gravels was probably derived from the denudation of gold-bearing quartz veins nearby. Surprisingly, gold derived in this manner has some commercial value, even though the original vein rocks do not constitute workable ore (Perry, 1929).
In spite of indications that no one will get rich looking for gold in Vermont, gold hunters still abound in the state. Every summer people converge on the gold-bearing rivers and streams, seeking to recover “free gold” from stream gravels.
Gold has been reported in many places in the state of especially on the east side of the Green Mountains. Just about any river or stream the drains the eastern half of Vermont is known to carry gold. This is placer gold That is found in the gravel of the streams where it is close to bedrock. It doesn't appear as sparkles on the stone, instead it is followed in the bottoms of the streams because it is heavier than anything else.
Several years ago one lucky prospector was able to find a concentration of gold in one of the streams that yielded over $2800 worth of gold for about an hours worth of work. No matter how you look at it this is a good hour's pay.
In the past century there have been many gold mines that actually sold stock in the mining venture. More often than not these were some kind of scheme to liberate money from the suckers, but it still remains that gold is being found to this day in Vermont.
As far as we know, there has never been found lode gold in Vermont, however there are plenty of indications that it might exist. Because of the ground cover it is extremely difficult to do any prospecting in the eastern United States. In Vermont we have greenstone associated with granite intrusions that usually are indicators of gold deposits.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 01/19/2012 11:48AM by Sea Hunter.
New Member
Re: Vermont Gold Prospecting
February 23, 2011 07:19AM
And someday, if they reopen their waters to dredgers, I'll be back! it has been said there is as much gold in Vermont as there was in California in 1900.
Special Member
Re: Vermont Gold Prospecting
February 26, 2011 04:16AM
There have been some efforts to lighten up on the dredging laws in VT. I wish they could be sucessful as it is promising for gold there. We need prospectors need to stand together for this. Communication is lacking it seems when it come to Vermont prospectors.

Steve
New Member
Re: Vermont Gold Prospecting
January 13, 2012 09:36PM
Now that winter is upon us I've been doing a lot of research into some potential areas to go next year. If you are interested I'm compiling a list of areas at

www.vermontgoldandtreasure.com
Special Member
Re: Vermont Gold Prospecting
January 14, 2012 03:41AM
I'm not real keen on making it too easy for folks to find a propecting spot. Learn the process of finding and asking property owner permission. Stoories from reliable souces are surfacing about places being "raided" without the owners knowlege. Not a pretty site.
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Lifetime Member
Re: Vermont Gold Prospecting
January 19, 2012 11:46AM
The dredging and sluice law is a farce. I hear Vt has suspended the sluicing and dreging laws on 12/31/11 Do me a favor and check this out for us.
George Streeter
New Member
Re: Vermont Gold Prospecting
February 03, 2012 09:21PM
9.30.2011Gravel dredging in Vermont rivers .... today's WTF FAQ
It is, unquestionably, the biggest hot button topic in the state today.

If you want to fire up the coffee shop, stir up things at work, or get an earful from a bar full of locals, just start digging in to the topic of gravel dredging in Vermont's rivers.

In case you've been in the Red Sox dugout for the last 30 days, here’s how it went down. Vermont got hit by a hurricane. Vermont roads/homes/businesses got hammered. And so, Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin “lifted the ban” on gravel dredging in the state’s rivers as way to speed and ease the cost of recovery.

I was there at one of the Governor's stumping stops, a week after the storm, covered with mud and sweat and fiberglass insulation like everybody else. Shumlin hopped up into the back of a flatbed in miked-up and neatly pressed shirt, and encouraged the crowd to “dig deep” in the river.

At the time, a few eyebrows went up. But people were busy doing the work that needed to be done, and the thought of a little digging in the river didn't freak anybody out, so things moved on.

Today, however, it’s a different story. Excavators and large-haul dump trucks are parked in riverbeds around the state. Gravel is being scooped out by the ton, banks are getting reinforced, and in many cases it’s happening in places which were totally unaffected by flooding during Hurricane Irene. This wasnt an official lifting of the ban/laws As far as i see it was just a way to allow people rebuild there yards and property from the flooding without breaking the law.I havent seen anything more current or official.
Special Member
Re: Vermont Gold Prospecting
February 03, 2012 11:34PM
I'm hoping that this display by mother nature will wake up those that think a little sluicing and dredging is any match to all the crud that ended up in the river.

Steve
New Member
Re: Vermont Gold Prospecting
February 13, 2012 08:58AM
I spent 4 weeks after the hurricane cleaning garbage,junk,car parts,etc. from a mountain bike trail system that was flooded out by a river.It was so sad.There was even a WHOLE porta pottie that had been left in the middle of the woods.It was an amazing powerful act by mother nature.I believe the hurricane helped in many ways to purge the rivers and streams to the ocean.Im 39 years old and i have never seen flooding like we had in my life.Some say it had been 85 years since the water had been that high.Most of my worry went to whats the wind going to destroy? What trees will come down?The rain we got in such a short time did more damage than the wind could have ever thought of doing....what a mess.This spring I have plans to continue cleanup.On a good note lets hope the rushing waters churned up some gold,treasures,etc for the hunters to find.Then again maybe it pounded it just down deeper....who knows. P Sr.
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